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Ignore?
True
A noun names a person place or thing.
True
Common nouns name any one of a class of person, place, or thing.
False
Proper nouns name a specific person, place, or thing. Proper nouns are never capitalized.
False
Plural nouns show ownership.
True
Verbs express action, condition, or state of being.
False
There are six basic types of verbs: action verbs, linking verbs, helping verbs, transitive verbs, intransitive verbs, and plural verbs.
True
Helping verbs are added to another verb to make the meaning clearer. Helping verbs include any form of to be.
True
Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns.
False
Never use an adjective after a linking verb.
True
Adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.
False
All adverbs are formed by adding -ly to an adjective.
False
Prepositions link a verb to another word.
True
A pronoun gets its meaning from the noun it stands for. The noun is called the antecedent.
True
Conjunctions connect words or groups of words.
True
Interjections express strong emotions and are usually set off with an exclamation mark (!).
proper nouns
Proper adjectives are formed from (common nouns, proper nouns).
the
The three articles are a, an, and (the, then).
definite article
'The' is called the (indefinite article, definite article).
predicate adjectives
(Predicate adjectives, Proper adjectives), which describe the subject of the sentence, are adjectives separated from the noun or pronoun by a linking verb.
conjunctive adverbs
(Interjections, Conjunctive adverbs) are used to connect other words and to link ideas and paragraphs.
seven
There are _______ different coordinating conjunctions.
in pairs
Correlative conjunctions also link similar words or word groups, but they are always used (in pairs, one at a time).
name groups
Collective nouns (name groups, show ownership).
I
(I, Which) is a personal pronoun.
Yours
(Yours, Herself) is a possessive pronoun.
add emphasis
Intensive pronouns, unlike reflexive pronouns, (begin a subordinate clause, add emphasis).
Interrogative pronouns
(Interrogative pronouns, Indefinite pronouns) ask a question. They are: what, which, who, whom, whose.
verb
Every sentence must have a noun and a (preposition, verb).
mental
Action verbs can be visible and (mental, linking).
transitive
In the sentence “Luis dropped his hat,” the verb dropped is (transitive, intransitive).
intransitive
In the sentence “Nita awoke early,” the verb awoke is (transitive, intransitive).
Who?/What?
To determine if a verb is transitive, ask yourself (“Who?”/“What?”, “How many?”) after the verb.
Linking verbs
(Helping verbs, Linking verbs) join the subject and the predicate and do not show action.
to be
Helping verbs, which are added to another verb to make the meaning clearer, can include any form of (to be, to see).
adjective
In the sentence “I traded my sandwich for three oatmeal cookies,” the word oatmeal is a/n (noun, adjective).
noun
The (outside) of the boat needs scraping.
adjective
You should scrape the boat without (outside) help.
adverb
Let’s sit (outside) and laugh at you as you work in the blazing sun.
preposition
The ambulance is parked right (outside) the yard, next to the beehive.
adjective
The politician repented of his (past) mistakes.
preposition
Turn right (past) the store with the neon sign in the window.
adverb
Did you hear that song (before?) (part of speech)
adverb
Always follow (through with) what you start.
preposition
The remark went right (through) one ear and out the other.
conjunction
The gardener mowed the lawn (after) he reread Lady Chatterly’s Lover.