Level 16 Level 18
Level 17

Reactions


65 words 0 ignored

Ready to learn       Ready to review

Ignore words

Check the boxes below to ignore/unignore words, then click save at the bottom. Ignored words will never appear in any learning session.

All None

Ignore?
Acknowledge
(v) to accept or admit that something exists, is true or is real: He never acknowledges his mistakes.
Acknowledge
(v) to thank someone for something they have done or given you, especially in writing or by saying it publicly: We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of everyone who helped us.
Acknowledge
(v) to show that you have seen someone or that you recognise them, for example by smiling or speaking to them: They barely acknowledge each other in public.
Agonise
(v) to spend a long time worrying and being upset about something: For years I agonised over whether I could have helped my daughter.
Apathy
(n) a feeling of having no interest in or enthusiasm about anything, or of not being willing to make any effort to change things: Few people voted in the election, presumably just because of apathy.
Avoid
(v) to try to prevent something from happening: Try to avoid confrontation.
Avoid
(v) to try not to go near someone or something: We went early to avoid the crowds.
Avoid
(v) to choose not to do something in order to achieve a better result: When taking this medication it is advisable to avoid alcohol.
Behaviour
(n) the way that someone or something behaves: Anna was sick of her brother's behaviour.
Chuckle
(n) a quiet laugh: There were a couple of chuckles from one member of the audience.
Chuckle
(v) to laugh quietly, especially in a private or secret way: As she read her book, she chuckled softly.
Comfort
(n) a physically relaxed state, without any pain or other unpleasant feelings: The airline is keen to improve passenger comfort.
Comfort
(n) a feeling of being less sad or worried about something than you were previously: My mother was always there to offer comfort.
Comfort
(n) a pleasant way of life in which you have everything you need: Now he can live in comfort for the rest of his life.
Comfort
(v) to make someone feel less sad, worried or disappointed: He went upstairs to comfort the baby.
Conduct
(n) the way someone behaves, especially in relation to particular rules or accepted ways of behaving: Two players were sent off for violent conduct.
Conduct
(v) to do something in an organised way: The agreement doesn't allow you to conduct business from your home.
Consequence
(n) a result or effect of something: She said exactly what she felt, without fear of the consequences.
Contentment
(n) the happiness you feel when you have everything you want and you enjoy your life: He has found contentment and satisfaction in his work.
Cross
(adj) angry: The neighbours got cross every time we put our music on.
Dignity
(n) the impressive behaviour of someone who controls their emotions in a difficult situation: She faced all her problems with dignity.
Disgust
(n) a very strong feeling of not liking something: The idea of eating meat fills me with disgust.
Disgust
(v) if something disgusts you, it is so bad or immoral that it makes you angry and upset: Your whole attitude disgusts me.
Disillusioned
(adj) disappointed because you have discovered that someone or something is not as good as you had believed: Voters are very disillusioned with the democratic process.
Fed up
(adj) annoyed or bored with something that you feel you have accepted for too long: I'm fed up with this job.
Giggle
(n) a high laugh, especially a nervous or silly one: The sound of giggles came from the girls' room.
Giggle
(v) to laugh in a nervous, excited or silly way that is difficult to control: The children whispered and giggled all the way through the film.
Glance
(n) a quick look at someone or something: She had a quick glance at the newspaper as she gulped down her coffee.
Glance
(v) to look somewhere quickly and then look away: He glanced over his shoulder nervously.
Glimpse
(n) an occasion when you see someone or something for a moment only: The crowd were anxious for a glimpse of the President.
Glimpse
(v) to see someone or something for a moment or not completely: He glimpsed a short white-haired figure heading for the back gate.
Gloat
(v) to show that you are happy and proud at your own success or at someone else's failure: He was there to gloat over their defeat.
Glum
(adj) looking sad, as if you expect something bad to happen: You look a bit glum. Has something happened?
Grimace
(n) an ugly expression that you make by twisting your face, for example because you are in pain or do not like something: His tortured grimace showed he was in pain.
Grimace
(v) to make an ugly expression by twisting your face, for example because you are in pain or do not like something: She grimaced as she swallowed the medicine.
Grin
(n) a big smile that shows your teeth: 'A great win,' Mike said with a broad grin.
Grin
(v) to smile showing your teeth: Ruth grinned at him as she waved goodbye.
Handle
(v) to take action to deal with a difficult situation: The government was criticised for the way it handled the crisis.
Impatient
(adj) annoyed because something is not happening as quickly as you want or in the way you want: 'Come on!' said Maggie, becoming impatient.
Inertia
(n) a situation in which something does not change for a long time: There's so much inertia on the committee that nothing ever gets done.
Manners
(n) traditionally accepted ways of behaving that show a polite respect for other people: Children learn manners by observing their parents.
Manoeuvre
(n) an action or movement that you need care or skill to do: Dexter tried every manoeuvre he could to overtake the truck.
Manoeuvre
(v) to move someone or something in a situation that needs care or skill: Katherine's good at manoeuvring her car through heavy traffic.
Moan
(n) an annoying complaint, especially about something that is not important: I haven't got time to listen to your moans and groans.
Moan
(n) a long low sound you make because of pain, sadness or pleasure: She let out a low moan of anguish.
Moan
(v) to complain about something in an annoying way: Ben was moaning about his job again.
Moan
(v) if someone moans, they make a long low sound because of pain, sadness or pleasure: James continued to moan loudly as the pain intensified.
Mock
(v) to make someone or something look stupid by laughing at them, copying them, or saying something that is not kind: Are you trying to mock me?
Neglect
(n) the failure to give someone or something the care or attention they need: There's an important need to protect children from abuse and neglect.
Neglect
(v) to fail to look after someone when you are responsible for them: What should we do about parents who neglect their children?
Neglect
(v) to fail to do something that you should do: He couldn't neglect his duties as an officer.
Peep
(n) a quick look at something: I'll just take a peep inside.
Peep
(v) to look at something quickly and secretly, usually from a place where you think you cannot be seen: She tried to peep through the gates to see the garden.
Peer
(v) to look very carefully, especially because something is difficult to see: She was peering through the window.
Prevent
(v) to stop something from happening or stop someone from doing something: Regular cleaning may help prevent infection.
Rejoice
(v) to feel very happy about something, or to celebrate something in a happy way: Montaigne seemed to rejoice in the humiliation of others.
Resent
(v) to experience angry, unhappy feelings because you think you have been treated unfairly or without enough respect: The girls in the family resented all the attention that Peter was getting.
Resolute
(adj) extremely determined: We're resolute in our determination to oppose these measures.
Smirk
(n) an unpleasant smile: Wipe that smirk off your face!
Smirk
(v) to smile in an unpleasant way because something bad has happened to someone else, or because you think you have achieved an advantage over them: I know you've won, but there's no need to smirk.
Snap
(v) to suddenly lose control and become extremely angry or upset because a situation has become too annoying or difficult: She was bound to snap under all that pressure.
Snap
(v) to speak to someone in a sudden, angry way: 'What do you want now?' he snapped angrily.
Tactic
(n) a particular method or plan for achieving something: The governor's tactics involved accusing his opponent of being too liberal.
Terror
(n) a strong feeling of fear: Thousands of islanders fled in terror yesterday as the volcano erupted.
Terror
(n) violence used for making people very frightened in order to achieve political aims: This is a deliberate campaign of terror.