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Nouns and Verbs from Greek


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bromide
an overused, cliché moral statement
polemic
a controversial argument, as one against some opinion, doctrine, etc.
litany
a tedious recital or repetitive series
ochlocracy
government by a mob; mob rule.
paragon
a model or pattern of excellence or of a particular excellence
philatelist
the collecting of stamps and other postal matter as a hobby or an investment.
semaphore
a system of sending messages by holding the arms or two flags or poles in certain positions according to an alphabetic code.
pastiche
an artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period
aphorism
a pithy observation that contains a general truth
apogee
the highest point in the development of something; the climax or culmination
diadem
a crown
epithet
a characterizing word or phrase used in place of a name or title
logician
a person who is skilled in logic.
pedantry
excessive concern with minor details and rules
panegyric
a lofty oration or writing in praise of a person or thing; eulogy.
syllogism
an instance in which a conclusion is drawn from two given premises, each of which shares a term with the conclusion and a common term not present in the conclusion
cynic
a person who believes that only selfishness motivates human actions
treacle
contrived or unrestrained sentimentality
timocracy
a form of government in which love of honor is the dominant motive of the rulers.
homily
A discourse or sermon to an audience
paradox
a statement or proposition that seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth.
paroxysm
a sudden attack or violent expression of a particular emotion or activity
phlegm
the thick mucus secreted in the respiratory passages and discharged through the mouth
prosody
the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
pusillanimity
the state or condition of being cowardly; timidity; cowardliness.
entropy
A measure of the amount of statistical information and noise present in a signal.
cathexis
the investment of emotional significance in an activity, object, or idea.
lithography
the art or process of producing a picture, writing, or the like, on a flat, specially prepared stone, with some greasy or oily substance, and of taking ink impressions from this as in ordinary printing.
aorist
a verbal tense expressing a single action, often in the past tense
allophone
any of the speech sounds that represent a single perceptually distinct units of sound in a specified language that distinguish one word from another
athanasia
deathlessness; immortality.
demiurge
1 Plato's benevolent deity. 2 the Gnostic concept of a malevolent deity who is inferior to the supreme deity. 3. (figuratively) an autonomous creative force.
deontology
ethics, especially that branch dealing with duty, moral obligation, and right action.
eisegesis
an interpretation, especially of Scripture, that expresses the interpreter's own ideas, bias, or the like, rather than the meaning of the text.
ecphonesis
the use of an exclamatory phrase
endogamy
the custom of marrying only within the limits of a local community, clan, or tribe.
endophora
the use of a word or phrase to refer to something either preceding it or following it within a text or discourse
enthymeme
a syllogism or other argument in which a premise or the conclusion is unexpressed.
epexegesis
the addition of a word or words to explain a preceding word or sentence.
ethos
the characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations
exogamy
the custom of marrying outside a community, clan, or tribe.
exegesis
critical explanation or interpretation of a religious text
exophora
a internal reference within a given text or discourse to something that is external to that text or discourse
eponym
a word derived from a person's name
epistemology
a branch of philosophy that investigates the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowledge.
hamartia
a fatal flaw leading to the downfall of a tragic hero
hapax legomenon
A word occurring only once in a given corpus.
hepatoscopy
inspection of the liver (for divination)
hyponymy
a term that denotes a subcategory of a more general class
cataphora
the use of a word or phrase referring to a subsequent word or phrase within a text or discourse
kerygma
the preaching or proclamation of religious truths, especially the Christian gospel
mimesis
imitation of the supposed words of another, in order to represent her character.
misanthrope
a hater of humankind.
ochlophobia
an abnormal fear of crowds.
ornithology
the branch of zoology that deals with birds.
paralipsis
the device of giving emphasis by professing to say little or nothing about a subject
plutocracy
the rule or power of wealth or of the wealthy.
polymath
a person of great learning in several fields of study
polymathy
learning in many fields; encyclopedic knowledge.
tautology
the saying of the same thing twice in different words, generally considered to be a fault of style; a statement that is true by necessity or by virtue of its logical form.
tetragrammaton
the Hebrew name of God transliterated in four letters, often articulated as Yahweh or Jehovah.
theotokos
a title of the Virgin Mary as the Mother of the incarnate Son of God.
troglodyte
a prehistoric cave dweller.
glossophobia
fear of speaking, especially in public
hagiography
a study or biography of saints.
hermeneutics
the science of interpretation, especially of biblical or literary texts
hoi polloi
The common people; the masses
homograph
words spelled the same with different meanings
homonym
A word with the same sound as another, but with different meaning
homoousian
Having the same essence or substance, especially with reference to the first and second persons of the Trinity
homophone
A word or letter with the same sound as another.
hubris
excessive pride or self-confidence; arrogance.
catechesis
religious instruction by means of questions and answers (especially in preparation for baptism or confirmation)
metanoia
change in one's way of life resulting from penitence or spiritual conversion.
nous
The mind or intellect, reason, both rational and emotional; common sense
oenophile
a person who enjoys wines, usually as a connoisseur.
ontogeny
the development or developmental history of an individual organism.
panoply
a wide-ranging and impressive array or display
parousia
the prophesied return of Christ to earth at the Last Judgment; the Second Coming
phalanx
a group of heavily armed infantry formed in ranks and files close and deep, with shields joined and long spears overlapping.
philhellene
a friend or supporter of the Greeks.
phylogeny
the development or evolution of a particular group of organisms.
polysemy
a condition in which a single word, phrase, or concept has more than one meaning or connotation.
meme
a cultural item that is transmitted by repetition and replication in a manner analogous to the biological transmission of genes.
soteriology
a doctrine of salvation
synechism
The tendency to regard things such as space, time, and law as continuous.
teleology
the explanation of phenomena by the purpose they serve rather than by postulated causes.
thanatology
the study of death and its surrounding circumstances, as in forensic medicine.
thanatophobia
an abnormal fear of death.
toponym
a place name.
antinomianism
a Protestant doctrine affirming that Christians are exempt from certain 'moral' laws.
philistine
a person who is hostile or indifferent to culture and the arts, or who has no understanding of them
anathema
a person or thing detested, loathed or consigned to damnation; curse or diving punishment
aegis
A shield or protective armor
aetiology
The science, doctrine, or demonstration of causes
apocope
the loss of a sound or sounds at the end of a word
aposiopesis
a sudden breaking off in the midst of a sentence, as if from inability or unwillingness to proceed.
asyndeton
A rhetorical, stylistic construction in which conjunctions are deliberately omitted from a series of words, phrases, clauses.
ataraxia
a state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquillity.
axiom
a self-evident truth that requires no proof.
diptych
a hinged two-leaved tablet used in ancient times for writing on with a stylus.
doxology
a hymn or form of words containing an ascription of praise to God.
etiology
The establishment or study of a cause, origin, or reason for something.
anacoluthon
a construction involving a break in grammatical sequence
anacoluthia
lack of grammatical sequence or coherence, especially in a sentence.
anaphora
the repetition of words at the beginning of multiple successive verses, clauses, or sentences
apodosis
the 'then' clause of a conditional sentence expressing a consequence, contrasted with the 'protasis' (an 'if' clause expressing the condition)
philippic
a bitter attack or denunciation, especially a verbal one.
encomium
a formal expression of high praise; eulogy
epanaphora
the use of a word referring to or replacing a word used earlier in a sentence, to avoid repetition
hecatomb
A sacrifice of 100 oxen or cattle
hyperdulia
A high level of veneration given to the Virgin Mary only.
hypostasis
That which forms the basis of anything
hyperbaton
an inversion of word order, especially for the sake of emphasis
metathesis
the transposition of sounds or letters in a word.
misopedia
hatred of children, especially one's own.
numen
the spirit or divine power presiding over a thing or place
ontology
the branch of metaphysics that studies the nature of existence or being as such.
protasis
the 'if' clause of a conditional sentence expressing a condition, contrasted with the 'apodosis' (a 'then' clause expressing a consequence)
pyrrhic victory
a victory that inflicts such a devastating toll on the victor that it is tantamount to defeat.
sycophant
a self-seeking, servile flatterer; fawning parasite.
chiasmus
a reversal in the order of words in two otherwise parallel phrases
choragus
the leader of a dramatic chorus.
clepsydra
an ancient device for measuring time by the regulated flow of water or mercury through a small aperture.
kyrie eleison
a short repeated invocation used in many Christian liturgies
paean
a song of praise or triumph; a thing that expresses enthusiastic praise
parochialism
a limited or narrow outlook, especially focused on a local area; narrow-mindedness
sophist
a person who reasons with clever but fallacious arguments.
trope
a figurative or metaphorical use of a word or expression; a significant or recurrent theme; a motif
sword of damocles
used to refer to a precarious situation.
gordian knot
an exceedingly complicated problem
repose
To cause to stop or to rest after motion
catechize
to instruct or interrogate by means of question and answer (especially in Christian doctrine)
deixis
a word or phrase or pronoun that requires additional contextual information to be understood
metastasize
to spread to other sites in the body by metastasis (of a cancer)
pander
gratify or indulge (an immoral or distasteful desire); a pimp
prognosticate
to forecast or predict from present signs
pleonasm
the use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning
neologism
a new word or phrase
androgyne
one that has characteristics of both male and female
stele
a stone slab or pillar bearing an inscription or design
hierophant
an interpreter of esoteric mysteries