Calling all volunteers!

Kick-start your Memrise working career by filling in this first spreadsheet of the most frequently used German words. (The first 1,000 have been covered in the introductory set, so we're working from 1,000 upwards). The links to the sets will be posted here as they're created, so keep your eyes peeled! Any questions you have please ask here, and we'll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!

Posted by memrise_ 12/2/11, last update 1/18/12 (2 years ago)
  • http://www.memrise.com/set/100... 

    Posted by technoparty 12/2/11 (2 years ago)
  • http://www.memrise.com/set/100... 

    Posted by technoparty 12/2/11 (2 years ago)
  • It would be useful to have some guidance on how to go about helping. I downloaded the spreadsheets but if I fill it out where do I send it? Is there a  complete list of categories (ie part of speech, plural, etc.) that we should fill out or are we only doing meanings for the time being?

    Posted by Robodl95 12/3/11 (2 years ago)
  • It would be useful to have some guidance on how to go about helping. I downloaded the spreadsheets but if I fill it out where do I send it? Is there a  complete list of categories (ie part of speech, plural, etc.) that we should fill out or are we only doing meanings for the time being?

    Posted by Robodl95 12/3/11 (2 years ago)
  • I'm working on 1001-1050. The columns I have so far are German, English, Gender, Part of speech, altwords and alt definitions. Since there is a gender field does that mean that we should not put the gender in front of the noun? I'm confused about how words with multiple definitions work.

    Posted by Robodl95 12/4/11 (2 years ago)
  • I'm working on 1001-1050. The columns I have so far are German, English, Gender, Part of speech, altwords and alt definitions. Since there is a gender field does that mean that we should not put the gender in front of the noun? I'm confused about how words with multiple definitions work.

    Posted by Robodl95 12/4/11 (2 years ago)
  • Hi there! Thanks very much for helping out, and for the useful feedback.Let me try and answer your questions. Regarding the gender, at the moment theGerman words are all filled out under the 'German' column, right?  As faras I know, the German nouns should already be written with the definite articlepreceding them (i.e. das Mädchen, der Mann and so on). But we also want thegender to be written under the gender heading, so that we have a norm acrossall the languages which will be helpful for us in future developments: so pleasewrite 'm', 'f' and 'n' where relevant under the 'Gender' heading for the nouns.With multiple English definitions, they should just be separated by a semicolon(we may need to develop something more complex than this, but think it shoulddo the job at the moment for designating a difference in meaning). Does thismake sense? So if schön, for example, means beautiful and good, then theseshould be separated with a semicolon: ‘beautiful; good’. I’ll try and get backto you more thoroughly in the next 24 hours to explain in more detail how thisworks. (As I can see I haven’t covered everything you might mean by alternativedefinitions). Hope this helps clear a couple of things up, and thank you foryour patience!

    Posted by technoparty 12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • Hi there! Thanks very much for helping out, and for the useful feedback.Let me try and answer your questions. Regarding the gender, at the moment theGerman words are all filled out under the 'German' column, right?  As faras I know, the German nouns should already be written with the definite articlepreceding them (i.e. das Mädchen, der Mann and so on). But we also want thegender to be written under the gender heading, so that we have a norm acrossall the languages which will be helpful for us in future developments: so pleasewrite 'm', 'f' and 'n' where relevant under the 'Gender' heading for the nouns.With multiple English definitions, they should just be separated by a semicolon(we may need to develop something more complex than this, but think it shoulddo the job at the moment for designating a difference in meaning). Does thismake sense? So if schön, for example, means beautiful and good, then theseshould be separated with a semicolon: ‘beautiful; good’. I’ll try and get backto you more thoroughly in the next 24 hours to explain in more detail how thisworks. (As I can see I haven’t covered everything you might mean by alternativedefinitions). Hope this helps clear a couple of things up, and thank you foryour patience!

    Posted by technoparty 12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • Thanks for this reply technoparty - a couple of important points here though: if there is more than one English meaning, then one ONE should be put in the "english" field. Then the other meanings should be put in the "alternative english" field, separated by a semi colon. The "alternatives" are going to be displayed during learning sessions very soon, so you will able to see all of them, and all will be accepted as correct answers. But the main "english" column should only contain one definition, not multiple ones. Does that make sense?You are exactly right about the gender - the noun should have the definite article and the gender should be added in a separate field - I know that this seems a bit redundant, but it gives us much more power to introduce test types later on that will work across all languages, so it would be a huge help if we can do it this way.So the columns that you should have, in total are:German; plural / inflected form; alternative german, english, alternative english, part of speech, gender, special propertiesThe "alternative definition" and "alternative word" will actually work as names for the fields, but it can be a bit confusing what exactly they mean, so I prefer using the clearer "alternative german" and "alternative english".Does that all make sense? Thanks!

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • Thanks for this reply technoparty - a couple of important points here though: if there is more than one English meaning, then one ONE should be put in the "english" field. Then the other meanings should be put in the "alternative english" field, separated by a semi colon. The "alternatives" are going to be displayed during learning sessions very soon, so you will able to see all of them, and all will be accepted as correct answers. But the main "english" column should only contain one definition, not multiple ones. Does that make sense?You are exactly right about the gender - the noun should have the definite article and the gender should be added in a separate field - I know that this seems a bit redundant, but it gives us much more power to introduce test types later on that will work across all languages, so it would be a huge help if we can do it this way.So the columns that you should have, in total are:German; plural / inflected form; alternative german, english, alternative english, part of speech, gender, special propertiesThe "alternative definition" and "alternative word" will actually work as names for the fields, but it can be a bit confusing what exactly they mean, so I prefer using the clearer "alternative german" and "alternative english".Does that all make sense? Thanks!

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • Just noticed that I introduced a new field there without due fanfare - I have renamed the "pronunciation" field, which was not being used for the german, "plural / inflected form". This means that at the moment when you get  test correct on a noun, you will see its plural form flash up every time. Thereby strengthening the familiarity with that. We can start testing on the plurals and inflected forms as well, but we need to get more flexible on marking before we do that - at the moment we don't have any "alternatives" for the pronunciation field, which we would need to have in order to do that properly.

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • Just noticed that I introduced a new field there without due fanfare - I have renamed the "pronunciation" field, which was not being used for the german, "plural / inflected form". This means that at the moment when you get  test correct on a noun, you will see its plural form flash up every time. Thereby strengthening the familiarity with that. We can start testing on the plurals and inflected forms as well, but we need to get more flexible on marking before we do that - at the moment we don't have any "alternatives" for the pronunciation field, which we would need to have in order to do that properly.

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/5/11 (2 years ago)
    1. What is the inflected form? Genitive ending? 2. Where do we send completed lists. 3. Is there any importance to which word is first in the english? 4. I need to add a word. Wiederholen can mean to repeat or bring and they're conjugated differently so they should be different items.
    Posted by Robodl95 12/5/11 (2 years ago)
    1. What is the inflected form? Genitive ending? 2. Where do we send completed lists. 3. Is there any importance to which word is first in the english? 4. I need to add a word. Wiederholen can mean to repeat or bring and they're conjugated differently so they should be different items.
    Posted by Robodl95 12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • hi ben, some more questions/discussion stuffplural: i guess without article, as that would always be "die"inflected form/plural, this needs to be differentiated or i doubt it helps people.for example house, singular/plural:nominativ: das Haus/die Häusergenitiv: des Hauses/der Häuserdativ: dem Haus(e)/den Häusernakkusativ: das Haus/die Häuserthere is a difference between plural, genitive, and dative s/pAlso whoever works on a sheet, should post so in the respective forum thread, as to avoid doing stuff twiceand as to part of speech, what system to use here, the english one? different languages have different classifications here i think. and if we use the english one, use abbreviations or write it out (eg. "n" or "noun" etc) //edit: actually I just did some research and apparently there are even different systems within the same language.

    Posted by niklassa 12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • hi ben, some more questions/discussion stuffplural: i guess without article, as that would always be "die"inflected form/plural, this needs to be differentiated or i doubt it helps people.for example house, singular/plural:nominativ: das Haus/die Häusergenitiv: des Hauses/der Häuserdativ: dem Haus(e)/den Häusernakkusativ: das Haus/die Häuserthere is a difference between plural, genitive, and dative s/pAlso whoever works on a sheet, should post so in the respective forum thread, as to avoid doing stuff twiceand as to part of speech, what system to use here, the english one? different languages have different classifications here i think. and if we use the english one, use abbreviations or write it out (eg. "n" or "noun" etc) //edit: actually I just did some research and apparently there are even different systems within the same language.

    Posted by niklassa 12/5/11 (2 years ago)
  • Hi Robodi, thanks for your questions. The FAQs have just been updated, so I'll try and have a shot at answering your queries here based on the new outlines:1) At the moment the genitive inflections are not being listed, as whilst they're helpful to know, it's arguably not of immediate importance to the absolute beginner. So under 'inflected form/plural' the nominative plural of the noun is required for a noun, or if it's a STRONG verb, its preterite and perfect form. (Weak verb forms are generally more regular so are being ommitted for the time being). So under 'Haus' there should be 'die Häuser', and under 'essen' 'aß; gegessen' - separated by a semicolon and space. Does this make sense?2) Completed lists (i.e. both after filling in the 'not yet completed' fields and after moderation) should be uploaded again, with an altered heading reflecting what stage the set is at. So if you are editing it, the title should be begin with 'EDITING (German Frequency etc...') so that no-one else works on the same set. Then when you have filled in all the not yet completed fields change the beginning of the title to 'WAITING FOR MODERATOR'. When the field has been moderated by the moderator, they can then re-upload it with 'FINISHED' as the beginning of the title.3) The first word should be the most important one! Obviously this is not always completely straightforward, but there should be one main meaning, and the others can be given in the alternative English, with semicolons separating them. For nouns I would not give the english definite article in the main translation i.e. 'the table', but put that in the 'alternative english', as usually it's more intuitive in English to say 'table' without the definite article. For both German and english alternative definitions you should put an underscore immediately before the words which are essentially being repeated (i.e. '_the table', when 'table' has been the main english meaning). The underscore means it will not come up as an alternative meaning (alternative meanings will be shown very soon on the sets as you learn them), but will be accepted as being a correct answer.4) Wiederholen doesn't mean bring, as far as I know, and its preterite is always wiederholte, wiederholt. However we wouldn't want this on the spreadsheet as its a weak verb, which we're not doing at the moment. Hope this helps!

    Posted by technoparty 12/7/11 (2 years ago)
  • Hi Robodi, thanks for your questions. The FAQs have just been updated, so I'll try and have a shot at answering your queries here based on the new outlines:1) At the moment the genitive inflections are not being listed, as whilst they're helpful to know, it's arguably not of immediate importance to the absolute beginner. So under 'inflected form/plural' the nominative plural of the noun is required for a noun, or if it's a STRONG verb, its preterite and perfect form. (Weak verb forms are generally more regular so are being ommitted for the time being). So under 'Haus' there should be 'die Häuser', and under 'essen' 'aß; gegessen' - separated by a semicolon and space. Does this make sense?2) Completed lists (i.e. both after filling in the 'not yet completed' fields and after moderation) should be uploaded again, with an altered heading reflecting what stage the set is at. So if you are editing it, the title should be begin with 'EDITING (German Frequency etc...') so that no-one else works on the same set. Then when you have filled in all the not yet completed fields change the beginning of the title to 'WAITING FOR MODERATOR'. When the field has been moderated by the moderator, they can then re-upload it with 'FINISHED' as the beginning of the title.3) The first word should be the most important one! Obviously this is not always completely straightforward, but there should be one main meaning, and the others can be given in the alternative English, with semicolons separating them. For nouns I would not give the english definite article in the main translation i.e. 'the table', but put that in the 'alternative english', as usually it's more intuitive in English to say 'table' without the definite article. For both German and english alternative definitions you should put an underscore immediately before the words which are essentially being repeated (i.e. '_the table', when 'table' has been the main english meaning). The underscore means it will not come up as an alternative meaning (alternative meanings will be shown very soon on the sets as you learn them), but will be accepted as being a correct answer.4) Wiederholen doesn't mean bring, as far as I know, and its preterite is always wiederholte, wiederholt. However we wouldn't want this on the spreadsheet as its a weak verb, which we're not doing at the moment. Hope this helps!

    Posted by technoparty 12/7/11 (2 years ago)
  • 2) I can't upload spreadsheets to the existing wordlists if that's what you mean. 4) My verb dictionary lists it as wiederholen - to repeat (wiederholte, habe wiederholt) and also an entry for wiederholen - to bring/fetch back (holte wieder, habe wiedergeholt)

    Posted by Robodl95 12/7/11 (2 years ago)
  • 2) I can't upload spreadsheets to the existing wordlists if that's what you mean. 4) My verb dictionary lists it as wiederholen - to repeat (wiederholte, habe wiederholt) and also an entry for wiederholen - to bring/fetch back (holte wieder, habe wiedergeholt)

    Posted by Robodl95 12/7/11 (2 years ago)
  • i'm german native and wiederholen is either to repeat, or (holen is to fetch) "to get back" if it was taken from you before, even then you would rather say "zurückholen", other uses like "to bring back" are very archaic and you'll only read those in very old books.

    Posted by niklassa 12/7/11 (2 years ago)
  • i'm german native and wiederholen is either to repeat, or (holen is to fetch) "to get back" if it was taken from you before, even then you would rather say "zurückholen", other uses like "to bring back" are very archaic and you'll only read those in very old books.

    Posted by niklassa 12/7/11 (2 years ago)
  • is it just me or is there no way to download set spreadsheets anymore? i cant seem to find the button/link, which makes it kinda hard to do any work ;)

    Posted by niklassa 12/10/11 (2 years ago)
  • is it just me or is there no way to download set spreadsheets anymore? i cant seem to find the button/link, which makes it kinda hard to do any work ;)

    Posted by niklassa 12/10/11 (2 years ago)
  • Hi, sorry to have been totally off the ball on this for the last few days - I have been travelling and had limited internet access. Very sorry for not getting back on this faster.It turned out that somehow you had lost "topic curator" status in this recent update. I have given it back to you so you can now upload the spreadsheet back to that wordlist. Which one were you editing?Thanks for all of your excellent work, it is massively appreciated!

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/11/11 (2 years ago)
  • Hi, sorry to have been totally off the ball on this for the last few days - I have been travelling and had limited internet access. Very sorry for not getting back on this faster.It turned out that somehow you had lost "topic curator" status in this recent update. I have given it back to you so you can now upload the spreadsheet back to that wordlist. Which one were you editing?Thanks for all of your excellent work, it is massively appreciated!

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/11/11 (2 years ago)
  • Yes, thanks for the heads up... that button does seem to have gone missing. I will get this fixed ASAP. Very sorry about this. 

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/11/11 (2 years ago)
  • Yes, thanks for the heads up... that button does seem to have gone missing. I will get this fixed ASAP. Very sorry about this. 

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/11/11 (2 years ago)
  • I can't download spreadsheets either.

    Posted by Robodl95 12/11/11 (2 years ago)
  • I can't download spreadsheets either.

    Posted by Robodl95 12/11/11 (2 years ago)
  • Been using this site for about a month to practice Spanish. I could of used this thirty years ago when i was learning German. I am a native English speaker and lived in Germany for ten years. I think i could help

    Posted by timpower 12/13/11 (2 years ago)
  • Been using this site for about a month to practice Spanish. I could of used this thirty years ago when i was learning German. I am a native English speaker and lived in Germany for ten years. I think i could help

    Posted by timpower 12/13/11 (2 years ago)
  • That is fixed now. Apologies again for the inconvenience.

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/13/11 (2 years ago)
  • That is fixed now. Apologies again for the inconvenience.

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/13/11 (2 years ago)
  • It would be amazing to have your help! The instructions for the moderation process are here - http://www.memrise.com/faq/ger... - so if you would like to get started on a set of 50 words, then please let me know and I will give you the editing permissions. It would be hugely appreciated!Thanks!

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/13/11 (2 years ago)
  • It would be amazing to have your help! The instructions for the moderation process are here - http://www.memrise.com/faq/ger... - so if you would like to get started on a set of 50 words, then please let me know and I will give you the editing permissions. It would be hugely appreciated!Thanks!

    Posted by BenWhately Staff   12/13/11 (2 years ago)
  • Should you still need any help with checking lists, I'd love to help. 

    Posted by danielw 1/7/12 (2 years ago)
  • Should you still need any help with checking lists, I'd love to help. 

    Posted by danielw 1/7/12 (2 years ago)
  • Hi danielw, thanks for your response - we'd love you to help, the more the merrier! At the moment the best way to find the frequency courses that still need editing or moderating is to go to 'All Courses' under the German section, scroll to the bottom, click on 'Show all courses', and search for frequency - then one by one you can see all the courses and their current statuses - i.e. 'BEING MODERATED by blo, German Frequency 1050-1100), etc. I've just had a look for you and at the moment all the frequency courses are currently being moderated/edited by someone - however if you can hold on to the end of the day, I'll have some spreadsheets ready for you by then! Thank you for your patience - I'll post the link here and on the forum to the spreadsheets when their ready to be edited (for the fields to be completed). Danke!

    Posted by technoparty 1/9/12 (2 years ago)
  • Hi danielw, thanks for your response - we'd love you to help, the more the merrier! At the moment the best way to find the frequency courses that still need editing or moderating is to go to 'All Courses' under the German section, scroll to the bottom, click on 'Show all courses', and search for frequency - then one by one you can see all the courses and their current statuses - i.e. 'BEING MODERATED by blo, German Frequency 1050-1100), etc. I've just had a look for you and at the moment all the frequency courses are currently being moderated/edited by someone - however if you can hold on to the end of the day, I'll have some spreadsheets ready for you by then! Thank you for your patience - I'll post the link here and on the forum to the spreadsheets when their ready to be edited (for the fields to be completed). Danke!

    Posted by technoparty 1/9/12 (2 years ago)
  • Hello danielw!Here is the link for the next spreadsheet which needs to be completed: http://www.memrise.com/set/100...I hope the FAQs are easy to follow - any problems or questions at all that you might have please just post on the forum and we'll get back to you as soon as possible. Remember when you start editing the wordset to change the title to BEING EDITED by daniel w, German Frequency 1301-1350, so that other volunteers know not to touch it till you're done. And likewise when you're done please change the title, so that moderators are aware that they can start moderating. I hope that's clear.Thank you very much!

    Posted by technoparty 1/9/12 (2 years ago)
  • Hello danielw!Here is the link for the next spreadsheet which needs to be completed: http://www.memrise.com/set/100...I hope the FAQs are easy to follow - any problems or questions at all that you might have please just post on the forum and we'll get back to you as soon as possible. Remember when you start editing the wordset to change the title to BEING EDITED by daniel w, German Frequency 1301-1350, so that other volunteers know not to touch it till you're done. And likewise when you're done please change the title, so that moderators are aware that they can start moderating. I hope that's clear.Thank you very much!

    Posted by technoparty 1/9/12 (2 years ago)
  • I'd like to thank Technoparty and all the volunteers for their kick ass job adding high frequency German word lists in Memrise. I've just taken up learning German from scratch two days ago and I'm already 400 words in. I'm loving the introductory course, it's such a fast way to learn, the most advanced I've seen yet.  My German language kickstart language strategy starts with learning the top 2500 most frequently used words (making notes on pronunciation) and then drilling verb conjugations in every tense.

    Posted by jack.kinsella 1/16/12 (2 years ago)
  • I'd like to thank Technoparty and all the volunteers for their kick ass job adding high frequency German word lists in Memrise. I've just taken up learning German from scratch two days ago and I'm already 400 words in. I'm loving the introductory course, it's such a fast way to learn, the most advanced I've seen yet.  My German language kickstart language strategy starts with learning the top 2500 most frequently used words (making notes on pronunciation) and then drilling verb conjugations in every tense.

    Posted by jack.kinsella 1/16/12 (2 years ago)
  • Thanks Jack!!!! Any probs/suggestions for improvement, just let us know!

    Posted by technoparty 1/18/12 (2 years ago)
  • Thanks Jack!!!! Any probs/suggestions for improvement, just let us know!

    Posted by technoparty 1/18/12 (2 years ago)
  • Do you have any links to guides on making good mnemonics? 

    Posted by jack.kinsella 1/18/12 (2 years ago)
  • Do you have any links to guides on making good mnemonics? 

    Posted by jack.kinsella 1/18/12 (2 years ago)
  • The key I think to making good mnemonics is to practice visuals in your head. At the beginning it will naturally come slowly to think of an amusing or graphic mnemonic. But if you just start saying a (foreign) word in your head, with an English native speaker mind-set, you'll find things occur to you - with increasing rapidity.The first mem I was proud of was 'le robinet' ('tap' in French). It struck me that the English word 'robin' was in there. So I thought: I could use the robin bird as part of the mem. The next thing to do is to make the mnemonic relevant to the English meaning of the word. So combining a robin bird with a tap, in some kind of context. Obviously this will be quite strange, and possibly counter intuitive at the beginning, but usually precisely because it IS a bit strange, it will stick with you and stand out in your memory. In this case, I imagined a robin bird perched on a tap, crying 'eh' every time it's little feet get wet. 'Robin-eh!' - getting his feet wet on a tap. This is my general process when creating a mem.Everyone gets mem-fear: I think the best thing to do is to see which ones appeal to you when you're learning, and if you can think of one which works better for YOU, then create one. It doesn't matter if you think it only makes sense to you, or if it's not witty, or whatever. The main thing is, is that it's memorable.There's obviously lots of different types of mnemonics you can do. The 'robinet' one I described is a kind of visual-phonetic one - which I think works well, because you have the sound of the foreign word, and its English translation in the mnemonic sentence. But for some people, or for some words, etymology, or an image, or something else will work better.Does this help at all? I'm sure there are a lot of resources on the internet about this, but I think what I've noted above include the basic premises of making a good mem. I stress again: the main thing about mems, is that they're memorable. If you like someone else's mem, then it's probably been amusing, or odd, or interesting. It's caught your attention. Try applying that to yours, and you'll soon be spouting them.All the best, Technoparty

    Posted by technoparty 1/18/12 (2 years ago)
  • The key I think to making good mnemonics is to practice visuals in your head. At the beginning it will naturally come slowly to think of an amusing or graphic mnemonic. But if you just start saying a (foreign) word in your head, with an English native speaker mind-set, you'll find things occur to you - with increasing rapidity.The first mem I was proud of was 'le robinet' ('tap' in French). It struck me that the English word 'robin' was in there. So I thought: I could use the robin bird as part of the mem. The next thing to do is to make the mnemonic relevant to the English meaning of the word. So combining a robin bird with a tap, in some kind of context. Obviously this will be quite strange, and possibly counter intuitive at the beginning, but usually precisely because it IS a bit strange, it will stick with you and stand out in your memory. In this case, I imagined a robin bird perched on a tap, crying 'eh' every time it's little feet get wet. 'Robin-eh!' - getting his feet wet on a tap. This is my general process when creating a mem.Everyone gets mem-fear: I think the best thing to do is to see which ones appeal to you when you're learning, and if you can think of one which works better for YOU, then create one. It doesn't matter if you think it only makes sense to you, or if it's not witty, or whatever. The main thing is, is that it's memorable.There's obviously lots of different types of mnemonics you can do. The 'robinet' one I described is a kind of visual-phonetic one - which I think works well, because you have the sound of the foreign word, and its English translation in the mnemonic sentence. But for some people, or for some words, etymology, or an image, or something else will work better.Does this help at all? I'm sure there are a lot of resources on the internet about this, but I think what I've noted above include the basic premises of making a good mem. I stress again: the main thing about mems, is that they're memorable. If you like someone else's mem, then it's probably been amusing, or odd, or interesting. It's caught your attention. Try applying that to yours, and you'll soon be spouting them.All the best, Technoparty

    Posted by technoparty 1/18/12 (2 years ago)

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